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101 Trauma-Informed Interventions: Activities, Exercises and Assignments to Move the Client and Therapy Forward

101 Trauma-Informed Interventions: Activities, Exercises and Assignments to Move the Client and Therapy Forward

by Linda A. Curran

This is an imminently practical workbook that shows a variety of invaluable techniques to get centered, calm and organized. An effective and enjoyable guide to help you feel in charge of yourself." ~ Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. This is the workbook that all mental health professionals wish they had at the beginning of their careers. Containing over 100 approaches to effectively deal with trauma, this workbook pulls together a wide array of treatments into one concise resource. Equally useful in both group and individual settings, these interventions will provide hope and healing for the client, as well as expand and solidify the professional's expertise. Tools and techniques drawn from the most effective trauma modalities: * Art Therapy * CBT * DBT * EFT * EMDR * Energy Psychology * Focusing * Gestalt Therapy * Guided Imagery * Mindfulness * Psychodrama * Sensorimotor Psychology * Somatic Experiencing and Movement Therapies -BONUS: Book includes a link to all reproducible worksheets! Print and use with clients right away!! Praise for 101 Trauma-Informed Interventions: “Linda Curran's unflagging energy and dedication to the healing of traumatized individuals has led to a voluminous, exciting, and comprehensive, 101 Trauma Informed Interventions. This workbook provides a plethora of effective tools -- traditional as well as innovative -- that can be used in whole or as a part of a course of therapy and also as self-help. The variety of options offered goes a long way towards dispelling the (unfortunately) popular misconception that there are only a limited number of interventions that help people to recover from trauma. Survivors as well as therapists who have been frustrated by the rigidity of strict adherence to evidence based practice will be greatly relieved to find a wealth of useful strategies to experiment, evaluate, and sort into a personally tailored trauma recovery program. This workbook is a god-send for the trauma field, expanding the possibilities for recovery in a most generous way.” ~ Babette Rothschild, MSW author of The Body Remembers and 8 Keys to Safe Trauma Recovery "Linda Curran has carefully and knowledgeably curated a practical, effective collection of interventions that actually work for trauma survivors. Any clinician committed to helping those suffering from posttraumatic stress needs to have these tools and resources to draw upon, because standard talk therapy, nine times out of ten, is simply not going to cut it. These exercises will." ~ Belleruth Naparstek, LISW, author of Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal “Drawing from the whole spectrum of trauma-based therapies, Linda Curran has compiled a sampling of practical exercises designed to help therapists and their clients better navigate the mine field that trauma work can be and find the path to healing.” ~ Richard Schwartz, Ph.D. author of Internal Family Systems Therapy "101 Trauma-Informed Interventions provides an accessible functional “playbook” for therapists committed to the rehabilitation of the client with a trauma history. In a readable volume Curran integrates diverse approaches of treatment and emphasizes the unique role that trauma plays in mental health. Underlying this eclectic strategy is the common theme emphasizing that healing will only begin when the trauma related feelings embedded in the body are appreciated." ~ Stephen W. Porges, Ph.D., author of The Polyvagal Theory "An interesting compendium of potential interventions that can be interwoven into any therapist's existing conceptual framework" ~ Louis Cozolino, Ph.D., Pepperdine University, and author of 5 books including the best-seller The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy, Healing the Social Brain (2nd edition)

Trauma

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[ {"term":"Commensurate","description":"To be Equal"},{"term":"emotional disorder","description":"There are several different emotional disorders, and people can have more than one. Someone with an anxiety disorder has a lot more than the usual amount of fears and nervousness. Someone with a depressive disorder often feels sad, irritable, hopeless, or moody. A person with an obsessive-compulsive disorder or trauma-related disorder may have thoughts or reactions that impact their thinking, feeling, and behaviour, causing major problems in their day-to-day life."},{"term":"evidence based practice","description":"Evidence based practice means applying the best available research results when making decisions."},{"term":"informed consent","description":"Informed consent means our workers will explain to you and your child:\r\n\r\nWhy the service is being proposed; \r\nThe nature of the service; \r\nWho will be providing the service; \r\nWhat are the expected benefits; \r\nWhat are the alternatives to having the service; \r\nWhat are the risks and side effects; \r\nWhat are the likely consequences of not having the service; \r\nWhat are the limits of confidentiality; \r\nbefore asking you to agree to the service."},{"term":"intellectual disability","description":"Someone with an intellectual disability has limitations in thinking and problem-solving skills (also called intellectual functioning) and day-to-day life and social skills (also called adaptive functioning). The problems begin in childhood and last for the person’s whole life. Each person with an intellectual disability is different and might need a different kind of support."},{"term":"Psychoeducation","description":"Information and teaching to empower a person with a mental health condition to cope with the condition effectively"},{"term":"Reactive attachment disorder ","description":"Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is a very specific diagnosis that can only be made by a qualified psychiatrist, psychologist, or physician. RAD refers to a very limited set of circumstances in which children are thought to not have the opportunity to develop any specific attachment to a caregiver. Onset of the problems must begin before age five and cannot be due to another mental health or developmental problem, and the child must have reached a developmental age of at least 9 months old. Children with RAD cannot or do not seek or respond to any comfort, even when very distressed or hurt. Extremely insufficient care, such as neglect or repeated changes of primary caregivers, without meaningful contact with adults, is thought to “cause” the disorder."},{"term":"resilience","description":"An individual\\'s ability to adapt to stress and adversity"},{"term":"Trauma informed","description":"Trauma-informed care recognizes trauma symptoms in clients and the role that trauma has played in their lives."} ]